Knowledge Exchange and Impact

 

 

The Department of History does more than just academic work. We also actively engage with our wider community in Hong Kong and beyond. Through our research and public engagement, we endeavor to bring to the broader community the importance and relevancy of to the everyday concerns of people and society, and to inform and empower the community.

 

Below are some of our projects:

 

 

The People's Trilogy: A New Approach to the Mao Era (1949-1976)
Professor Frank Dikötter's project constitutes a research effort unmatched in both the quantity and the quality of the archival evidence, the resulting three books - The Cultural Revolution: A People's History, 1962-1976 (2016), The Tragedy of Liberation: A History of the Chinese Revolution, 1945-1957 (2013), and Mao's Great Famine: The History of China's most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958-1962 (2010) - have shifted the ways in which both academic and lay readers view the Mao era (1949-1976) by providing, for the first time, systematic and profuse evidence drawn from dozens of party and overseas archives in the PRC to illustrate the impact of communism on ordinary people.

 

Impacts

 

Prizes and Awards

 

 

The Great Kantō Earthquake and a New Understanding of Responses to Natural Disasters
Professor Charles Schencking's research has revolutionized the understanding of how the Japanese have experienced, responded to, and recovered from catastrophic natural disasters over the past 100 years. Apart from book and journal articles – traditional research outputs that speak to academics and journalists, this Project also gave birth to an interactive website including a publicly accessible image and map archive, a museum exhibition, a Discovery Channel TV documentary, and keynote speeches, introducing to millions of public how the Japanese have interpreted, constructed, and learned from natural calamities and become world leaders in disaster response, recovery, and resilience.

 

Impacts

 

 

The Witness to War Project
Records and accounts about personal experiences in Hong Kong during the Second World War had always been scant. As time is running shorter and shorter for the War survivors, Dr. Peter Cunich and Mr. Bruce MacNamara, a history teacher at Canadian International School, came up with The Witness to War Project, a unique collaboration with local secondary schools.

 

In this project, the Department of History worked closely with the University Archives and the local secondary schools. The Department provided secondary school students with interview templates and briefings on historical methodology and the Second World War. The Archives showed the students about the University’s archival facilities and the importance of archiving historical documents. After the students interviewed their elderly family members about their war experiences, and recorded and transcribed the interviews, the Department selected the best interviews and placed them in the University Archives. Since 2006, more than 250 oral histories have been deposited at the Archives, making it the largest collection of publicly available interview transcripts on the Second World War in East Asia.

 

Impacts

 

Prizes and Awards

 

Messages
Prof. David Pomfret, Department Chairperson Department Chairperson
Prof. David Pomfret
We believe in the intrinsic value of creating knowledge of the past through research and the importance of disseminating this knowledge through publications, teaching, and engagement with our community.
What's Up?
New summer course
International Business History in the Twentieth Century with Dr. Michael Weatherburn
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New summer course
The Second World War in Asia and the Pacific, 1931-1953 with Dr. Dave Macri
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