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Dr. Maurits Meerwijk
Lecturer Maurits Meerwijk

 

BA University of Utrecht; MA (Modern History) Warw; PhD HKU

Office

Email Address

Office: TBC

meerwijk@connect.hku.hk

 

Current Research Project | Publications | Course

 

Dr Maurits Meerwijk is a historian of medicine, colonialism, and the environment in Asia. In 2017, he obtained his PhD at the University of Hong Kong on the history of the viral, mosquito-borne disease dengue fever. He subsequently joined the University of St Andrews as a research associate on the ERC-project Visual Representations of the Third Plague Pandemic. Since 2019, Maurits is an affiliate research scholar with the Centre for the Humanities and Medicine at HKU and taught courses on the history of contagion.

 

Maurits has contributed several publications on the history of science, technology, and medicine. His research concentrates on the study of vector-borne diseases in Asia at the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as well as their popular and scientific representation.

 

 

 

Current Research Project

 

Maurits is currently at work on a book on the history of plague in Java that draws importantly on the vast photographic archive of this event. He is also organizing a new research project on public health messaging in late-colonial Asia.

 

 

 

Publications

 

Articles

 

"Phantom Menace: Dengue and Yellow Fever in Asia", Bulletin of the History of Medicine 94, no. 2 (2020), 215 - 243.

 

"Viral Imagery of Dengue Fever in the Age of Bacteriology", Isis 111, no. 2 (2020), 239 - 263.

 

"Health Messaging and Napkin Epidemiology in the Netherlands", Somatosphere (7 May 2020).

 

"Tiger Mosquitoes from Ross to Gates", in C. Lynteris ed., Framing Animals as Epidemic Villains: Histories of Non-Human Disease Vectors (Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), 119 - 146.

 

"Fever City: Dengue in Colonial Hong Kong", Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society Hong Kong Branch 55 (2015), 7 - 31.

 

 

 

Teaching Course

 

  • HIST2175 Medicine, Propaganda, and Colonialism in Asia